FLOW Celebrates 10 Years throughout 2021


September 21 — Join Us for a Free Online Party as FLOW Celebrates 10 Years of Working Together to Keep the Great Lakes Public and Protected!

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We are proud that 2021 marks our 10th year of partnering with you to protect the Great Lakes. This is an exciting time of hope and optimism. FLOW now enjoys a solid foundation built from the work we’ve done in collaboration to protect the Great Lakes through application of public trust principles, work that cuts through politics and sustains communities with water that is clean, safe, affordable—and public. We are moving toward an economy buoyed by clean water and clean energy, and we’re going to make it happen together. Thank you to everyone who has supported FLOW since our founding in 2011, as well as those who joined us along the way during our first 10 years. Thank you for our shared successes. Your commitment to safeguarding our public waters is what drives us forward. We are asking you to continue supporting FLOW and our mission to protect the Great Lakes, groundwater, and drinking water for all. Together we will keep working for the love of water! 

Throughout 2021, FLOW will develop and share a series of video interviews with key FLOW supporters and stakeholders who have been instrumental to our work and shared successes over the past decade. We hope you enjoy theses stories and reflections and share them with others who might be inspired to join us in protecting freshwater for all:

“It’s not just a matter of saving water in a creek or a stream here or there. It’s a matter of engaging in global human rights activities. Resources that should be available for everybody,” says Peggy Case, executive director of Michigan Citizens for Water Conservation (MCWC), which helped give rise to FLOW. Read more reflections from Peggy Case here.

“It was 10 years ago that I first met Jim Olson, and I invited him to be a guest speaker for Green Elk Rapids,” recalls Royce Ragland, the organization’s co-founder and a founding FLOW board member. “He talked about his favorite thing—the public trust. I was just so taken with the idea. It’s an old thought. It combines everything from policy to stewardship to theology to philosophy. I loved it.” Read more reflections from Royce Ragland here.

“FLOW is responsible for the major success we’ve had so far as a movement in halting the Line 5 pipeline that crosses the Straits of Mackinac,” said FLOW senior policy advisor Dave Dempsey in this testimonial about the impact we’ve had during the past decade. During 2021, our 10th anniversary year, FLOW supporters and collaborators are sharing reflections on what our work together has meant to them and to the freshwaters of the Great Lakes Basin. “Without the public trust doctrine that Jim Olson and Liz Kirkwood have been advocating, that pipeline would be set to operate for another 50 years, and I think we’re in a position to shut it down, thanks for FLOW’s work on this. I think of the public trust doctrine as the key that can unlock all the environmental doors for us. It can protect our water, protect our air, protect us from climate change. It’s the secret weapon.”

“I’ve spent my whole life surrounded by water, with the exception of spending time in the desert. Living on the desert floor in Tucson, like 25-35 square miles, this urban sprawl is happening, and there’s no requirement for people to demonstrate that they have access to water. I thought to myself, ‘How is this sustainable?’ It drive me to focus on water law,” said FLOW executive director Liz Kirkwood.

“Without FLOW the Line 5 issue would not be alive in Canada. With the help of Liz’s leadership we have been able to put together a coalition here in Canada to start speaking up and start saying ‘It is a pipeline, for heaven sake. We’re against all the other pipelines, why are we being so quiet on this one?’ And this one is triply dangerous because it goes under a portion of the Great Lakes,” said Maude Barlow—a Canadian author and activist and board chair of Food & Water Watch.

“There isn’t another FLOW. There are many worthy environmental organizations but there isn’t another FLOW,” said Lana Pollack, former U.S. Chair of the International Joint Commission. “So I think that FLOW, although it’s not a political organization, it’s a deeply education organization. That has to come first before people will understand and demand of their government representatives protection for their most magnificent home.”